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Tour Guide

From the relaxed café culture of Buenos Aires to the natural beauty of the massive Iguazu Waterfalls, the stunning Perito Moreno glacier to the charming vineyards of Mendoza, Argentina is a magnificently beautiful country with world-class landscapes to match its delicious steaks and award-winning wine. It is a must for foodies, outdoor enthusiasts, wine enthusiasts, and history buffs due to its rich history, culture, and cuisine.

Despite the fact that Argentina is not perfect — it has its social, economic, and political problems — the country exceeded all of my expectations.

Take your time exploring this wonderful country, as the vast landscape is difficult to navigate and there are numerous things to see, such as wineries, tango lessons, and the towering snow-capped mountains of Patagonia. This Argentina travel guide will help you plan your trip, ensure your safety, and make the most of your time in this land of steak, wine, and mountains.


Facts about Argentina we bet you didn’t know before

  • Argentina is the eighth-largest country in the world by area.
  • Population: With a population of approximately 45 million, Argentina is one of the world’s least populous nations.
  • Approximately 97% of Argentines are of European descent, primarily of Spanish or Italian descent.
  • In addition to beef, Argentina is a leading exporter of wine, wheat, and fruits and vegetables.
  • Nobel Prizes: Argentinians have received the Nobel Peace Prize twice. Adolfo Pérez Esquivel, in 1980, for his defense of human rights. Carlos de Saavedra Lamas, in 1936, for his efforts to promote peace in South America.
  • The remains of the largest known dinosaur, the Patagotitan mayorum, were discovered by accident in Patagonia in 2008 by a farm worker.
  • Two Argentine films have won the Oscar for best foreign-language film. Argentina’s film industry is thriving. 1985’s La Historia Oficial (The Official Story) and 2010’s El Secreto de sus Ojos (The Secret in Their Eyes) were the winners.

Wondering when to book a flight to Cuba?

Argentina is a massive country with a wide variety of beautiful landscapes to discover, ranging from snow-capped glaciers to sun-kissed vineyards. When you travel will depend greatly on the locations that you have in mind to go to. The springtime in Argentina (from October to mid-December) and the fall time in Argentina (from April to mid-June) are, in our opinion, the best times to visit Argentina because you can avoid the crowds of tourists and the higher prices of the high season. Continue reading for weather information that is broken down regionally for North, Central, and South Argentina.

How to Get Around in Cuba

It takes longer than you might expect to travel throughout Argentina; distances are vast, and you are likely to spend a significant portion of your budget on transportation. Ground transportation (primarily buses) will provide a true sense of the country’s size and a chance to view the terrain. Domestic flights can save you a day or more if you’re planning to travel across large distances in Argentina, especially around Patagonia. The intercity bus network is extensive, but services in remote areas can be limited; car rental is recommended in these areas. In Argentina, train services are decrepit and limited, making them an unviable mode of travel. 

Places to visit in Argentina

  • Board the train to the sky

This tourist train is extremely overpriced, but the ride through the clouds and dense forest is so breathtaking that I don’t mind. From Salta, this is a 400-kilometer (250-mile), 16-hour round-trip journey into the Andes. As the train ascends to 4,200 meters (13,779 feet), spectacular views of mountains, forests, and valleys will be revealed. It operates only seasonally and on specific days of the week, so check the schedule prior to your visit. The price of 6,700 ARS includes a meal.

  • Stop by a winery

Argentina is one of the most renowned wine-producing regions in the world, and wine enthusiasts must visit a vineyard there. Mendoza is the most renowned wine region in the country and the best place for first-timers to visit. You can rent a bike and visit the wineries on your own, but there are many tours that take you to a few wineries, provide information on wine production, and offer free samples. Mendoza’s Wine Harvest Festival (“Fiesta de la Vendimia”) is held annually in February and March for true wine connoisseurs and features folk dancing, musical performances, fireworks, beauty contests, free wine, and colorful parades.

  • Climb Cerro Aconcagua

Cerro Aconcagua, at nearly 7,000 meters (23,000 feet) in height, is not only the tallest mountain in the country but also the tallest in the Western Hemisphere. It is estimated that it will take two weeks to reach the summit and acclimate to the altitude, so this is not an easy hike. But if you enjoy a challenge and are a seasoned hiker, you should consider this adventure! A guided ascent to the summit costs approximately 463,545 ARS, whereas an 8-day trek around the mountain (not to the summit, but around the various camps) costs approximately 146,554 ARS. The most popular option is a 4-day, 65,135 ARS per person hike around the mountain.

  • Explore Valle de la Luna

This dramatic landscape translated as “Valley of the Moon,” dates to the Triassic period. Winds and precipitation have shaped the rocks into bizarre formations, giving this area the appearance of a moonscape. Despite its arid climate, the region is a great place to observe wildlife, as it is home to foxes, owls, armadillos, and condors. The unique geological formations and fossil beds of Ischigualasto Provincial Park have earned it UNESCO World Heritage Site status. The cost of entry is 800 ARS.

  • Hike on Perito Moreno Glacier

The impressive Perito Moreno glacier can be found within the vast Los Glaciares National Park. It’s one of the coolest sights I’ve ever seen, measuring nearly 4,570 metres (15,000 feet) wide and 61 metres (200 feet) tall. You can hike (an epic experience) on the glacier or take a boat ride to see it up close. A full-day excursion with a boat ride costs approximately 10,000 ARS.

Things to do in Argentina

  • Gaze in awe at the glacier of Perito Moreno.

It is a very humbling experience to be able to stand in front of one of the most famous glaciers in the world. A jagged mass of crevasses and towering, knife-edged seracs can be seen as the glacier makes its way down from the icecap in a great motorway-like sweep. The real show starts when it collides with the southern arm of Lago Argentino, which causes enormous blocks of ice, some of which weigh hundreds of tonnes, to explode off the face of the glacier and fall into the waters below.

  • Put yourself through the rigors of a milonga.

In recent years, tango has attracted a completely new audience, as evidenced by the growing number of young people who are filling the dance floors of social clubs and traditional dancehalls for regular local tango events known as milongas. Even if you don’t dance yourself, it’s still a good idea to check out one of the many places that offer classes before the event. The sight of couples moving around the dance floor in what appears to be a trance-like state is mesmerizing to behold.

  • Get an up-close look at southern right whales

An astonishing variety of marine mammals call the nutrient-dense, chilly waters off the Penisula Valdés on the eastern coast of Patagonia their home. The southern right whale, the most well-known of all the visitors to the peninsula, makes its temporary home in the waters close to Puerto Pirámides from June until about the middle of December each year. There are very few things that can compare to the excitement of watching these enormous animals swim up to your boat, breaching the water, or sticking their tails up above the water’s surface as they dive for food.

  • Travel along the Wine Route (Ruta del Vino).

The Jesuits were responsible for the initial development of the vineyards in Cafayate, which are now recognized as some of the highest vineyards in the world. However, the torrontés grape, which is thought to have been brought over from the Rioja region of Spain in the late nineteenth century, is considered to be the specialty of the area. The delicate, flowery, and slightly acidic white wine that it produces is the ideal complement to the cuisine of the region, but it also pairs well with seafood and fish dishes.

  • Have a go at living like a gaucho for a while.

The vast plains of Argentina are considered by many gauchos to be their “spiritual home.” Staying in a traditional estancia allows guests the opportunity to experience life on horseback. There are many estancias that welcome paying guests, with the greatest concentration being in the province of Buenos Aires, specifically in and around San Antonio de Areco in the north and Cauelas and Lobos in the south. This can be for an overnight stay in one of the typically opulent rooms or for a “dia de campo,” which is a daylong excursion in which guests participate in outdoor activities such as horseback riding or polo class while being provided with hearty meals.

Shopping in Argentina

Spend some time perusing a country’s supermarkets if you truly wish to become acquainted with it. The largest retailers in Argentina are Coto, Disco, Jumbo, and the French-owned Carrefour. The enormous Jumbo outlet in Palermo, Buenos Aires has every product under the sun and has been dubbed the “international supermarket” for its selection of imported goods, although they are priced at a premium.

Like the majority of South America, Argentina enjoys its open-air markets and boutique shops. Numerous of them can be found in the enormous arcade on Calle Florida in Buenos Aires. There are numerous stores that specialize in leather and furs. Avenida Alvear is home to Louis Vuitton and Georgio Armani, so if you’re looking for something glitzy with a designer label, you should check it out.

There is a vast selection of fashion and leather goods in most commercial areas, and high-quality jackets, boots, and shoes are sold at very reasonable prices across the nation. However, Buenos Aires has a relatively mild climate, making it difficult to find truly cold-weather attire. In addition to being expensive, electronics are subject to hefty import fees. If the fluctuating exchange rate is in your favor, the cost of music, books, and movies may be a bargain.

In contrast to other regions in South America, credit card machines do not accept PINs. Therefore, if you have a card with PIN capability in your home country, you cannot use it in Argentina. Instead, you will be asked to sign the document, as is customary.

Tour Guide

From the relaxed café culture of Buenos Aires to the natural beauty of the massive Iguazu Waterfalls, the stunning Perito Moreno glacier to the charming vineyards of Mendoza, Argentina is a magnificently beautiful country with world-class landscapes to match its delicious steaks and award-winning wine. It is a must for foodies, outdoor enthusiasts, wine enthusiasts, and history buffs due to its rich history, culture, and cuisine.

Despite the fact that Argentina is not perfect — it has its social, economic, and political problems — the country exceeded all of my expectations.

Take your time exploring this wonderful country, as the vast landscape is difficult to navigate and there are numerous things to see, such as wineries, tango lessons, and the towering snow-capped mountains of Patagonia. This Argentina travel guide will help you plan your trip, ensure your safety, and make the most of your time in this land of steak, wine, and mountains.


Facts about Argentina we bet you didn’t know before

  • Argentina is the eighth-largest country in the world by area.
  • Population: With a population of approximately 45 million, Argentina is one of the world’s least populous nations.
  • Approximately 97% of Argentines are of European descent, primarily of Spanish or Italian descent.
  • In addition to beef, Argentina is a leading exporter of wine, wheat, and fruits and vegetables.
  • Nobel Prizes: Argentinians have received the Nobel Peace Prize twice. Adolfo Pérez Esquivel, in 1980, for his defense of human rights. Carlos de Saavedra Lamas, in 1936, for his efforts to promote peace in South America.
  • The remains of the largest known dinosaur, the Patagotitan mayorum, were discovered by accident in Patagonia in 2008 by a farm worker.
  • Two Argentine films have won the Oscar for best foreign-language film. Argentina’s film industry is thriving. 1985’s La Historia Oficial (The Official Story) and 2010’s El Secreto de sus Ojos (The Secret in Their Eyes) were the winners.

Wondering when to book a flight to Cuba?

Argentina is a massive country with a wide variety of beautiful landscapes to discover, ranging from snow-capped glaciers to sun-kissed vineyards. When you travel will depend greatly on the locations that you have in mind to go to. The springtime in Argentina (from October to mid-December) and the fall time in Argentina (from April to mid-June) are, in our opinion, the best times to visit Argentina because you can avoid the crowds of tourists and the higher prices of the high season. Continue reading for weather information that is broken down regionally for North, Central, and South Argentina.

How to Get Around in Cuba

It takes longer than you might expect to travel throughout Argentina; distances are vast, and you are likely to spend a significant portion of your budget on transportation. Ground transportation (primarily buses) will provide a true sense of the country’s size and a chance to view the terrain. Domestic flights can save you a day or more if you’re planning to travel across large distances in Argentina, especially around Patagonia. The intercity bus network is extensive, but services in remote areas can be limited; car rental is recommended in these areas. In Argentina, train services are decrepit and limited, making them an unviable mode of travel. 

Places to visit in Argentina

  • Board the train to the sky

This tourist train is extremely overpriced, but the ride through the clouds and dense forest is so breathtaking that I don’t mind. From Salta, this is a 400-kilometer (250-mile), 16-hour round-trip journey into the Andes. As the train ascends to 4,200 meters (13,779 feet), spectacular views of mountains, forests, and valleys will be revealed. It operates only seasonally and on specific days of the week, so check the schedule prior to your visit. The price of 6,700 ARS includes a meal.

  • Stop by a winery

Argentina is one of the most renowned wine-producing regions in the world, and wine enthusiasts must visit a vineyard there. Mendoza is the most renowned wine region in the country and the best place for first-timers to visit. You can rent a bike and visit the wineries on your own, but there are many tours that take you to a few wineries, provide information on wine production, and offer free samples. Mendoza’s Wine Harvest Festival (“Fiesta de la Vendimia”) is held annually in February and March for true wine connoisseurs and features folk dancing, musical performances, fireworks, beauty contests, free wine, and colorful parades.

  • Climb Cerro Aconcagua

Cerro Aconcagua, at nearly 7,000 meters (23,000 feet) in height, is not only the tallest mountain in the country but also the tallest in the Western Hemisphere. It is estimated that it will take two weeks to reach the summit and acclimate to the altitude, so this is not an easy hike. But if you enjoy a challenge and are a seasoned hiker, you should consider this adventure! A guided ascent to the summit costs approximately 463,545 ARS, whereas an 8-day trek around the mountain (not to the summit, but around the various camps) costs approximately 146,554 ARS. The most popular option is a 4-day, 65,135 ARS per person hike around the mountain.

  • Explore Valle de la Luna

This dramatic landscape translated as “Valley of the Moon,” dates to the Triassic period. Winds and precipitation have shaped the rocks into bizarre formations, giving this area the appearance of a moonscape. Despite its arid climate, the region is a great place to observe wildlife, as it is home to foxes, owls, armadillos, and condors. The unique geological formations and fossil beds of Ischigualasto Provincial Park have earned it UNESCO World Heritage Site status. The cost of entry is 800 ARS.

  • Hike on Perito Moreno Glacier

The impressive Perito Moreno glacier can be found within the vast Los Glaciares National Park. It’s one of the coolest sights I’ve ever seen, measuring nearly 4,570 metres (15,000 feet) wide and 61 metres (200 feet) tall. You can hike (an epic experience) on the glacier or take a boat ride to see it up close. A full-day excursion with a boat ride costs approximately 10,000 ARS.

Things to do in Argentina

  • Gaze in awe at the glacier of Perito Moreno.

It is a very humbling experience to be able to stand in front of one of the most famous glaciers in the world. A jagged mass of crevasses and towering, knife-edged seracs can be seen as the glacier makes its way down from the icecap in a great motorway-like sweep. The real show starts when it collides with the southern arm of Lago Argentino, which causes enormous blocks of ice, some of which weigh hundreds of tonnes, to explode off the face of the glacier and fall into the waters below.

  • Put yourself through the rigors of a milonga.

In recent years, tango has attracted a completely new audience, as evidenced by the growing number of young people who are filling the dance floors of social clubs and traditional dancehalls for regular local tango events known as milongas. Even if you don’t dance yourself, it’s still a good idea to check out one of the many places that offer classes before the event. The sight of couples moving around the dance floor in what appears to be a trance-like state is mesmerizing to behold.

  • Get an up-close look at southern right whales

An astonishing variety of marine mammals call the nutrient-dense, chilly waters off the Penisula Valdés on the eastern coast of Patagonia their home. The southern right whale, the most well-known of all the visitors to the peninsula, makes its temporary home in the waters close to Puerto Pirámides from June until about the middle of December each year. There are very few things that can compare to the excitement of watching these enormous animals swim up to your boat, breaching the water, or sticking their tails up above the water’s surface as they dive for food.

  • Travel along the Wine Route (Ruta del Vino).

The Jesuits were responsible for the initial development of the vineyards in Cafayate, which are now recognized as some of the highest vineyards in the world. However, the torrontés grape, which is thought to have been brought over from the Rioja region of Spain in the late nineteenth century, is considered to be the specialty of the area. The delicate, flowery, and slightly acidic white wine that it produces is the ideal complement to the cuisine of the region, but it also pairs well with seafood and fish dishes.

  • Have a go at living like a gaucho for a while.

The vast plains of Argentina are considered by many gauchos to be their “spiritual home.” Staying in a traditional estancia allows guests the opportunity to experience life on horseback. There are many estancias that welcome paying guests, with the greatest concentration being in the province of Buenos Aires, specifically in and around San Antonio de Areco in the north and Cauelas and Lobos in the south. This can be for an overnight stay in one of the typically opulent rooms or for a “dia de campo,” which is a daylong excursion in which guests participate in outdoor activities such as horseback riding or polo class while being provided with hearty meals.

Shopping in Argentina

Spend some time perusing a country’s supermarkets if you truly wish to become acquainted with it. The largest retailers in Argentina are Coto, Disco, Jumbo, and the French-owned Carrefour. The enormous Jumbo outlet in Palermo, Buenos Aires has every product under the sun and has been dubbed the “international supermarket” for its selection of imported goods, although they are priced at a premium.

Like the majority of South America, Argentina enjoys its open-air markets and boutique shops. Numerous of them can be found in the enormous arcade on Calle Florida in Buenos Aires. There are numerous stores that specialize in leather and furs. Avenida Alvear is home to Louis Vuitton and Georgio Armani, so if you’re looking for something glitzy with a designer label, you should check it out.

There is a vast selection of fashion and leather goods in most commercial areas, and high-quality jackets, boots, and shoes are sold at very reasonable prices across the nation. However, Buenos Aires has a relatively mild climate, making it difficult to find truly cold-weather attire. In addition to being expensive, electronics are subject to hefty import fees. If the fluctuating exchange rate is in your favor, the cost of music, books, and movies may be a bargain.

In contrast to other regions in South America, credit card machines do not accept PINs. Therefore, if you have a card with PIN capability in your home country, you cannot use it in Argentina. Instead, you will be asked to sign the document, as is customary.

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