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Tour Guide

Pre-Columbian architecture and multi-ethnic communities are just some of the
wonders of the Andes. In addition to South America's allure, Colombia has a lot more to offer. Only a handful of countries can claim to have as many landscapes to choose from as Colombia. The Zona Cafetera, with its coffee-strewn, emerald-green hilltops and sun-toasted Caribbean sands, is only a short elevation change away. As you continue upward, you will reach Bogotá, Colombia's bustling capital and the world's third-highest city. Adding a few more thousand meters brings you to the páramo's bizarre vegetation, including snow-capped mountains and high-altitude lakes (high-mountain plains). At this point, the Andes give way to Los Llanos, which is known as the Serengeti of South America because of its 550,000 square kilometers of tropical grasslands shared with Venezuela.

Excursions into Nature

There are numerous opportunities for outdoor enthusiasts to dive, climb, kayak,
raft, and soar in Colombia's diverse landscape. While San Gil is Colombia's undisputed adventure capital, the country as a whole has plenty of outdoor delights to offer. Some of the continent's most renowned and diverse hiking can be found here. Hikers can trek through the jungles of Ciudad Perdida and El Cocuy National Park to reach the ancient ruins of Tayrona civilization. Scuba divers will find paradise at Providencia's world-class reef, and whale watchers on the Pacific coast will be able to see majestic humpbacks in their natural habitat.

Culture That Is Out of This World

Archaeological and cultural sites from a variety of ancient civilizations can be
found throughout Colombia. Ciudad Perdida, the former capital of Tayrona, was
built between the 11th and 14th centuries and is one of the continent's oldest cities, a close second to Machu Picchu in terms of age and importance. San Agustn is also legendary, with more than 500 life-sized ancient sculpted statues dotting the surrounding countryside, some of which are more than 5000 years old and whose origins remain a mystery. Then there is Tierradentro, where
mysterious people dug out elaborate underground tombs, adding even more
mystery to Colombia's history.

Facts about Colombia we bet you didn’t know before

  • There are 46.3 million people in the United States
  • Spanish (the official language), as well as a variety of indigenous languages
  • Amount in money: Colombian peso
  • At 7.6 million people, it is Colombia’s largest city.
  • The international phone number 57
  • Zone of time difference: five hours

Wondering when to book a flight to Cuba?

December through March and June through September are the best months to
visit Colombia, which is a year-round destination. Even though the weather is
fairly consistent throughout the year, it can get chilly at night in the country's
higher regions, so be sure to bring some warm clothes.

The rainiest months are April-June and August-October, but even then, the
country is navigable and prices are lower than during the busier summer and fall
months.
The best time to visit Colombia's beaches is from December to March, when
temperatures are mild and sunny. Expect more people and higher prices at beach
resorts during this time of year. July and August are also good months to visit, but
be prepared for some rain.
Best time to see wildlife: June to December are considered the best months to
visit Colombia's Amazon because of the lower rainfall. Trails will be easier to
follow and wildlife at water sources will be easier to observe as a result.

Airlines that fly to Colombia

How to Get Around in Colombia

Due to the size and diversity of the country, there is a wide variety of comfort and quality options for bus travel; it is advisable to shop around at the kiosks of various bus companies located within larger stations. Larger, long-distance buses typically have reclining seats, restrooms, loud, cheesy music, and videos; wear warm clothing as the air conditioning is guaranteed to be arctic. Each city has a terminal de buses where intercity buses arrive; Bogotá has multiple terminals.

For shorter trips, you should sacrifice comfort and cost in favor of speed by purchasing a ticket on a buseta, colectivo, or other similar-sized minibus or minivan that departs when full. If you do not want to wait for hours, do not hand over your luggage or pay until you see that the bus is nearly full and ready to leave.

The most common mode of transportation in coffee-growing regions are sturdy Willy jeeps with two rows of covered seats and additional passengers clinging to the back. These are typically inexpensive, but the ride can be rough and there is limited space for luggage.

Places to Visit in Colombia

  • Cartagena

The sultry city of Cartagena is at the top of most travelers’ Colombia bucket lists. It is easy to see why: the stately old town is a magical walled complex of bougainvillea-draped cobblestone streets and shady squares where local performers shake, stamp, and twirl as a manifestation of the city’s renowned vitality.

You can absorb the atmosphere of Cartagena with as much or as little vigor as you desire. Laze away the day on Playa de Bocagrande or with long, leisurely lunches of ceviche made with coconut at a family-run restaurant. Cartagena is the place to enjoy a sundowner on a rooftop bar and experience the vibrant nightlife of the city’s bars and clubs at night.

  • Zona Cafetera

It is a small resort island separated from the Cuban mainland. This region is commonly known as Cayo Largo, which in the local language means “Long Cay.” It remains one of the best places to visit in Cuba to escape the crowds and enjoy some much-needed solitude along with the beautiful beaches. Playa Sirena, a popular beach on this island, attracts hundreds of thousands of visitors every day of the year. Another popular tourist destination in Cuba is the Marina, which is home to fascinating sea turtles and where tourists frequently witness seasonal hatchings.

  • Parque Nacional Natural Tayrona

The tropical beaches and secluded coves of Parque Nacional Natural Tayrona make it one of Colombia’s natural treasures. Located along the Caribbean coastline east of Santa Marta, this national park is a haven for relaxation, with the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta mountains as a backdrop.

 

Water currents at the majority of the beaches are too dangerous for swimming, so sunbathing and ambling along the jungle trails that border the coastline are the activities of choice. To avoid the crowds, take a speedboat to Playa Cristal, an uninhabited island with pristine waters and brilliant beaches. Plan your trip to Tayrona outside of the months of January and February, when the park is typically closed for maintenance.

  • Medellín

Once the stronghold of Pablo Escobar, Colombia’s most notorious drug lord, modern Medelln is a reborn city. Backpackers will find solace in the city’s abundance of hip music venues, while other travelers will appreciate the abundance of affluent neighborhoods with shady restaurant terraces and swanky bars. Due to its proximity to the Zona Cafetera and its perpetual spring-like climate, Medellin is one of the best cities to visit if you have limited time.

For art aficionados, Colombian heavyweight Fernando Botero’s influence is pervasive, with his iconic bloated statues adding humor to raucous market squares. To get a deeper understanding of the city, visit Comuna 13 and Moravia to see how street art and innovative forms of transportation have breathed new life into blighted neighborhoods. You can also ride a modern cable car that whisks you out of the valley and into Parque Arv, a nature reserve with pre-Hispanic trails winding through orchid-covered forests.

  • La Guajira Peninsula

In one of the most desolate and unique places to visit in Colombia, vast stretches of desert coexist with the brilliant blue of the Caribbean Sea. La Guajira Peninsula, inhabited by the indigenous Wayuu, has resisted conquest by invaders throughout history, and the Wayuu continue to reside in remote villages.

To appreciate the dazzling wildness of Colombia’s northernmost point, you must arrange a tour out of Riohacha. Spend at least one night on the peninsula and visit Playa Taroa, often considered Colombia’s most beautiful beach, where empty sand dunes plunge directly into the glistening water.

  • Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta

The Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, a mountain range in the northeast of Colombia, provides a tantalizing glimpse into the past. After a grueling three-day trek through dense jungle, you will reach La Ciudad Perdida, the most important archaeological site in Colombia. This once-crowded city’s stone terraces were constructed in 850 CE along a steep-sided ridge and were only reclaimed from the jungle in the 1970s. Only accessible by tour group, La Ciudad Perdida is remote, untouched, and blissfully devoid of visitors.

Things to do in Cuba

The Amazon jungle

Colombia’s Amazon jungle boasts an extraordinary abundance of flora and fauna that should be on the bucket list of any wildlife enthusiast. The Amazon jungle, which covers approximately one-third of Colombia’s territory, is largely inaccessible to tourists, but it remains the best place to encounter vast tracts of untouched rainforest.

Reserve a tour into the jungle from the remote outpost of Leticia and spend two nights exploring one of the wildest places on the planet. Boat trips gliding along the Ro Amazonas and hiking remote trails slicing through the forest floor

 

 

Tour Guide

Pre-Columbian architecture and multi-ethnic communities are just some of the
wonders of the Andes. In addition to South America's allure, Colombia has a lot more to offer. Only a handful of countries can claim to have as many landscapes to choose from as Colombia. The Zona Cafetera, with its coffee-strewn, emerald-green hilltops and sun-toasted Caribbean sands, is only a short elevation change away. As you continue upward, you will reach Bogotá, Colombia's bustling capital and the world's third-highest city. Adding a few more thousand meters brings you to the páramo's bizarre vegetation, including snow-capped mountains and high-altitude lakes (high-mountain plains). At this point, the Andes give way to Los Llanos, which is known as the Serengeti of South America because of its 550,000 square kilometers of tropical grasslands shared with Venezuela.

Excursions into Nature

There are numerous opportunities for outdoor enthusiasts to dive, climb, kayak,
raft, and soar in Colombia's diverse landscape. While San Gil is Colombia's undisputed adventure capital, the country as a whole has plenty of outdoor delights to offer. Some of the continent's most renowned and diverse hiking can be found here. Hikers can trek through the jungles of Ciudad Perdida and El Cocuy National Park to reach the ancient ruins of Tayrona civilization. Scuba divers will find paradise at Providencia's world-class reef, and whale watchers on the Pacific coast will be able to see majestic humpbacks in their natural habitat.

Culture That Is Out of This World

Archaeological and cultural sites from a variety of ancient civilizations can be
found throughout Colombia. Ciudad Perdida, the former capital of Tayrona, was
built between the 11th and 14th centuries and is one of the continent's oldest cities, a close second to Machu Picchu in terms of age and importance. San Agustn is also legendary, with more than 500 life-sized ancient sculpted statues dotting the surrounding countryside, some of which are more than 5000 years old and whose origins remain a mystery. Then there is Tierradentro, where
mysterious people dug out elaborate underground tombs, adding even more
mystery to Colombia's history.

Facts about Colombia we bet you didn’t know before

  • There are 46.3 million people in the United States
  • Spanish (the official language), as well as a variety of indigenous languages
  • Amount in money: Colombian peso
  • At 7.6 million people, it is Colombia’s largest city.
  • The international phone number 57
  • Zone of time difference: five hours

Wondering when to book a flight to Cuba?

December through March and June through September are the best months to
visit Colombia, which is a year-round destination. Even though the weather is
fairly consistent throughout the year, it can get chilly at night in the country's
higher regions, so be sure to bring some warm clothes.

The rainiest months are April-June and August-October, but even then, the
country is navigable and prices are lower than during the busier summer and fall
months.
The best time to visit Colombia's beaches is from December to March, when
temperatures are mild and sunny. Expect more people and higher prices at beach
resorts during this time of year. July and August are also good months to visit, but
be prepared for some rain.
Best time to see wildlife: June to December are considered the best months to
visit Colombia's Amazon because of the lower rainfall. Trails will be easier to
follow and wildlife at water sources will be easier to observe as a result.

Airlines that fly to Colombia

How to Get Around in Colombia

Due to the size and diversity of the country, there is a wide variety of comfort and quality options for bus travel; it is advisable to shop around at the kiosks of various bus companies located within larger stations. Larger, long-distance buses typically have reclining seats, restrooms, loud, cheesy music, and videos; wear warm clothing as the air conditioning is guaranteed to be arctic. Each city has a terminal de buses where intercity buses arrive; Bogotá has multiple terminals.

For shorter trips, you should sacrifice comfort and cost in favor of speed by purchasing a ticket on a buseta, colectivo, or other similar-sized minibus or minivan that departs when full. If you do not want to wait for hours, do not hand over your luggage or pay until you see that the bus is nearly full and ready to leave.

The most common mode of transportation in coffee-growing regions are sturdy Willy jeeps with two rows of covered seats and additional passengers clinging to the back. These are typically inexpensive, but the ride can be rough and there is limited space for luggage.

Places to Visit in Colombia

  • Cartagena

The sultry city of Cartagena is at the top of most travelers’ Colombia bucket lists. It is easy to see why: the stately old town is a magical walled complex of bougainvillea-draped cobblestone streets and shady squares where local performers shake, stamp, and twirl as a manifestation of the city’s renowned vitality.

You can absorb the atmosphere of Cartagena with as much or as little vigor as you desire. Laze away the day on Playa de Bocagrande or with long, leisurely lunches of ceviche made with coconut at a family-run restaurant. Cartagena is the place to enjoy a sundowner on a rooftop bar and experience the vibrant nightlife of the city’s bars and clubs at night.

  • Zona Cafetera

It is a small resort island separated from the Cuban mainland. This region is commonly known as Cayo Largo, which in the local language means “Long Cay.” It remains one of the best places to visit in Cuba to escape the crowds and enjoy some much-needed solitude along with the beautiful beaches. Playa Sirena, a popular beach on this island, attracts hundreds of thousands of visitors every day of the year. Another popular tourist destination in Cuba is the Marina, which is home to fascinating sea turtles and where tourists frequently witness seasonal hatchings.

  • Parque Nacional Natural Tayrona

The tropical beaches and secluded coves of Parque Nacional Natural Tayrona make it one of Colombia’s natural treasures. Located along the Caribbean coastline east of Santa Marta, this national park is a haven for relaxation, with the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta mountains as a backdrop.

 

Water currents at the majority of the beaches are too dangerous for swimming, so sunbathing and ambling along the jungle trails that border the coastline are the activities of choice. To avoid the crowds, take a speedboat to Playa Cristal, an uninhabited island with pristine waters and brilliant beaches. Plan your trip to Tayrona outside of the months of January and February, when the park is typically closed for maintenance.

  • Medellín

Once the stronghold of Pablo Escobar, Colombia’s most notorious drug lord, modern Medelln is a reborn city. Backpackers will find solace in the city’s abundance of hip music venues, while other travelers will appreciate the abundance of affluent neighborhoods with shady restaurant terraces and swanky bars. Due to its proximity to the Zona Cafetera and its perpetual spring-like climate, Medellin is one of the best cities to visit if you have limited time.

For art aficionados, Colombian heavyweight Fernando Botero’s influence is pervasive, with his iconic bloated statues adding humor to raucous market squares. To get a deeper understanding of the city, visit Comuna 13 and Moravia to see how street art and innovative forms of transportation have breathed new life into blighted neighborhoods. You can also ride a modern cable car that whisks you out of the valley and into Parque Arv, a nature reserve with pre-Hispanic trails winding through orchid-covered forests.

  • La Guajira Peninsula

In one of the most desolate and unique places to visit in Colombia, vast stretches of desert coexist with the brilliant blue of the Caribbean Sea. La Guajira Peninsula, inhabited by the indigenous Wayuu, has resisted conquest by invaders throughout history, and the Wayuu continue to reside in remote villages.

To appreciate the dazzling wildness of Colombia’s northernmost point, you must arrange a tour out of Riohacha. Spend at least one night on the peninsula and visit Playa Taroa, often considered Colombia’s most beautiful beach, where empty sand dunes plunge directly into the glistening water.

  • Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta

The Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, a mountain range in the northeast of Colombia, provides a tantalizing glimpse into the past. After a grueling three-day trek through dense jungle, you will reach La Ciudad Perdida, the most important archaeological site in Colombia. This once-crowded city’s stone terraces were constructed in 850 CE along a steep-sided ridge and were only reclaimed from the jungle in the 1970s. Only accessible by tour group, La Ciudad Perdida is remote, untouched, and blissfully devoid of visitors.

Things to do in Cuba

The Amazon jungle

Colombia’s Amazon jungle boasts an extraordinary abundance of flora and fauna that should be on the bucket list of any wildlife enthusiast. The Amazon jungle, which covers approximately one-third of Colombia’s territory, is largely inaccessible to tourists, but it remains the best place to encounter vast tracts of untouched rainforest.

Reserve a tour into the jungle from the remote outpost of Leticia and spend two nights exploring one of the wildest places on the planet. Boat trips gliding along the Ro Amazonas and hiking remote trails slicing through the forest floor

 

 

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