Get 30% Discount On Flight Reservations

Tour Guide

Cuba is like a prince in a pauper’s cloak: gold dust lingers behind the shabby facades. These abundant contrasts make travel here an exciting, exhilarating roller coaster ride. Expect the unexpected in this country, which is caught in a time warp and reeling from an economic embargo that has lingered for more than half a century. If Cuba were a book, it would be Ulysses by James Joyce: complex, difficult to comprehend, frequently misunderstood, but above all, a classic.

Historically Significant Relics 

Since musket-wielding pirates roamed the Caribbean, Cuba’s colonial cities have not changed much due to the absence of modern interference. In Havana, Trinidad, Remedios, and Camagüey, where grand squares and cobblestone streets tell ancient tales of opulence and intrigue, the atmosphere and architecture are particularly captivating. Despite pockets of preservation, many structures are still in ruins, like aging widows in need of a facelift. With additional funds, these heirlooms may yet recover. In fact, thanks to private investment, many of them have already undergone partial renovation, transforming into dazzling private homestays or retro-themed restaurants that proudly display their weighty historical heritage.

Cuba has rarely been more enjoyable to visit. Private enterprise is exhibiting the earliest signs of a creative spring, while the well-known enemy to the north has not yet diluted the cultural magic. Consequently, the nation is rife with experimentation. Here, a bohemian cafe where serious students debate Che Guevara’s contribution to the world revolution; there, is an avant-garde art studio where the furniture is as eccentric as the artworks. From rural Viales to urban Havana, the entire nation appears to be slowly emerging from a deep slumber. Now is the time to ride the wave.

Cuba is a Big Time Beaches 

The vast majority of Cuba’s tourists are drawn to the beautiful white-sand beaches that dot the country’s northern coastline and offshore islands. Beyond the beaches, however, is a land of fecund forests and crocodile-infested swamps, abandoned coffee plantations, and rugged mountains with revolutionary folklore and endemic species. Cuba, as noted by the German scientist Alexander von Humboldt, is a sort of Galápagos of the Caribbean where contradictory curiosities coexist. Get off the beaten path and go in search of them.

Facts about Cuba we bet you didn’t know before

  • Size and population: 11.2 million people living on a land area of 110,861 square kilometers. Both in terms of land mass and human population, Cuba is the largest island in the Caribbean.
    The literacy rate is extremely high and ranks among the highest in the world.
  • The Cuban peso (CUP) and the Cuban convertible peso (CUC) are the two forms of currency in Cuba (CUC).
  • The revolution took place between July 26, 1953, and January 1, 1959. The overthrow of the government that was led by Fulgencio Batista and the establishment of a revolutionary government that was led by Fidel Castro. Granma is the name of both a province in the eastern part of Cuba as well as one of Cuba’s national newspapers. Granma was the name of the boat that transported Fidel Castro and 81 other rebels from Mexico to Cuba in 1956. The vessel’s namesake, the grandmother of the boat’s first owner, inspired the boat’s moniker.
  • Christmas was a national holiday in Cuba until it was removed from the list of officially recognized holidays in 1969 and not reinstated until 1998.
  • Cuba is home to the bee hummingbird, which holds the record for being the smallest bird in the world.

Wondering when to book a flight to Cuba?

October through April is the optimal time to visit Cuba. This island has a wonderful Caribbean climate and a long season of beauty, with warm, sunny days and very little precipitation, especially in Havana and along the coast. The south coast beaches of Cuba enjoy the best weather on the island.

March and April are possibly the best months to visit Cuba, as the days are longer and sunnier (an average of seven hours of sunshine per day), the temperature and humidity are moderate, and there is little precipitation. The average daytime temperature in March and April is 27-29°C, while the average nighttime temperature is 19-21°C. Even during Cuba’s wettest months (May to September), the heat and humidity are rarely unbearable.

Airlines that fly to Cuba

You can get affordable airline tickets on Airline Reservations by searching for the airlines that offer the lowest fares to Cuba. We have direct connections with hundreds of full-service and low-cost carriers, giving you access to the widest range of affordable flight options and enabling you to easily compare booking prices across the board for all airlines that fly to Cuba.

How to Get Around in Cuba

Buses are the most common mode of transportation in Cuba, as few Cubans own cars. Two national bus networks exist. Vazul operates for foreign passport holders and Cubans paying in CUC, while the Empresa Omnibus Nacionales network operates for Cubans paying in national pesos.

Cuban taxis especially shared taxis, are an easy and relatively inexpensive mode of transportation. Car rental is another practical option. Train travel is slow but a great way to see the country, while cycling tours are becoming increasingly popular. For long distances, it may be advantageous to fly between destinations. Learn more about the pitfalls of the car rental and driving, getting around on buses, taxi options (Communal taxis, or taxis colectivos, long-distance taxis, tourist taxis, private taxis, bicitaxis, and moto-taxis), cycling, and train travel.

Places to Visit in Cuba

  • MARIA LA GORDA 

Maria La Gorda is a small town in the western region of Cuba. Maria La Gorda is one of the most popular tourist destinations in Cuba despite the fact that it lacks the colonial architecture and lively atmosphere for which Cuba is best known. Every year, adventure seekers flock to this location due to its thriving marine life. However, its Cuban charm and spectacular beaches make up for its lack of architecture. 

  • CAYO LARGO DEL SUR 

It is a small resort island separated from the Cuban mainland. This region is commonly known as Cayo Largo, which in the local language means “Long Cay.” It remains one of the best places to visit in Cuba to escape the crowds and enjoy some much-needed solitude along with the beautiful beaches. Playa Sirena, a popular beach on this island, attracts hundreds of thousands of visitors every day of the year. Another popular tourist destination in Cuba is the Marina, which is home to fascinating sea turtles and where tourists frequently witness seasonal hatchings.

  • SANTIAGO DE CUBA

Located in eastern Cuba, the popular Santiago de Cuba coastal city tour will make you feel as if you have stepped back in time. The region is still heavily influenced by its colonial past, as evidenced by the magnificent architecture of that time period. The most popular location in this area is Parque Cespedes. It is a plaza that contains and is surrounded by numerous colonial structures. Another popular attraction is the Castillo de San Pedro de la Roca, a magnificent 17th-century fortress with a breathtaking ocean view. 

  • VINALES 

Cuba has numerous national parks, each one more beautiful than the last. The best one, however, is located in the Vinales Valley. The valley is surrounded by mountains and contains abundant vegetation and tobacco plantations. There are also a number of caves, such as the Cuevas del Indio or Indian Caves, which are the most popular caves in this area. They are also the most desired destinations for adventure junkies. 

  • HAVANA

Havana is the capital city of Cuba, and exploring this vibrant city is a worthwhile experience. It has colonial mid-century architecture and is one of the most modern and cosmopolitan cities in the region. It has a vibrant nightlife culture and a coastline with spectacular views of the surrounding landscape and the ocean. Therefore, it remains a prime tourist destination and one of the most entertaining places to visit in Cuba.

Things to do in Cuba

  •  Playa Las Tumbas

What it is: a secluded beach on the westernmost point of the island, where palm trees, pure white sand, and crystal clear water predominate. It is four to five hours from Havana and is located at the tip of the Peninsula de Guanahacabibes National Park. No one ever said that having your own beach would be simple. Granted, there are more accessible and well-equipped beaches in Cuba. And many are attractive. But Las Tumbas gives you the feeling of having a private slice of paradise. The drive may be lengthy, but it is a great way to see parts of the island that few people see. Therefore, spending the night here is as much about the journey as it is about the destination.

  • Valle de Vinales

The Valle de Vinales tobacco plantation is a working plantation where tobacco and coffee, Cuba’s two most renowned agricultural exports, are grown. It is located in the Vinales Valley, a UNESCO World Heritage Site where you can stroll the fields while smoking a freshly-rolled cigar and sipping Cuban coffee. It’s the freshest cigar you’ll ever smoke, and although it’s not a household name like Paratagas or Romeo y Julieta, the experience here is far superior to that of a cigar factory for the casual Cuban traveler. It’s a popular tour stop, but despite the crowds, it’s still a great place for photos and an afternoon pick-me-up.

  •  The Ernest Hemingway Museum

Finca la Vigia is the former home of Ernest Hemingway, located about 10 miles outside of Havana. It is a sprawling hilltop estate with a swimming pool, Hemingway artifacts, and the author’s famous boat, the Pilar. In addition to writing The Old Man and the Sea and For Whom the Bell Tolls, he also penned these words in his imposing residence. Is it a tourist destination? Certainly, but it’s also one of the best-preserved mansions in the country, and there’s usually a Cuban band playing near the entrance, along with a full rum bar. You will also hear humorous anecdotes about Hemingway’s time here, such as how he used to spy on Ava Gardner while she was skinny dipping in the pool. 

  • National park Topes de Collantes 

What it is: a mountainous national park approximately 25 minutes south of Trinidad on the island’s southern coast. The park is located in the Sierra Escambray Mountains and features short trails that lead to underground caves, waterfalls, and concealed swimming holes. Most American tourists do not venture this far into natural Cuba, and the tropical mountain scenery is quintessentially Caribbean. It is the ideal escape from the towns and cities, as you can hike a few miles and swim in a pristine pool beneath a waterfall.

  • Mojitos are served somewhere in Havana

A Cuban drink that has become ubiquitous in American bars, made with rum, mint, sugar, and club soda. Hemingway made the margaritas at La Bodeguita del Medio famous, but sipping one at the Hotel Nacional is the epitome of celebrity in the 1950s. Or, visit La Chanchullero, which is considered by many to be the best in the city. It’s one of those eating/drinking experiences on everyone’s bucket list, like getting a cheesesteak in Philadelphia or wings in Buffalo. And nearly every bar in Havana will make a better mojito than any American bar because they use real sugar instead of syrup

Tour Guide

Cuba is like a prince in a pauper’s cloak: gold dust lingers behind the shabby facades. These abundant contrasts make travel here an exciting, exhilarating roller coaster ride. Expect the unexpected in this country, which is caught in a time warp and reeling from an economic embargo that has lingered for more than half a century. If Cuba were a book, it would be Ulysses by James Joyce: complex, difficult to comprehend, frequently misunderstood, but above all, a classic.

Historically Significant Relics 

Since musket-wielding pirates roamed the Caribbean, Cuba’s colonial cities have not changed much due to the absence of modern interference. In Havana, Trinidad, Remedios, and Camagüey, where grand squares and cobblestone streets tell ancient tales of opulence and intrigue, the atmosphere and architecture are particularly captivating. Despite pockets of preservation, many structures are still in ruins, like aging widows in need of a facelift. With additional funds, these heirlooms may yet recover. In fact, thanks to private investment, many of them have already undergone partial renovation, transforming into dazzling private homestays or retro-themed restaurants that proudly display their weighty historical heritage.

Cuba has rarely been more enjoyable to visit. Private enterprise is exhibiting the earliest signs of a creative spring, while the well-known enemy to the north has not yet diluted the cultural magic. Consequently, the nation is rife with experimentation. Here, a bohemian cafe where serious students debate Che Guevara’s contribution to the world revolution; there, is an avant-garde art studio where the furniture is as eccentric as the artworks. From rural Viales to urban Havana, the entire nation appears to be slowly emerging from a deep slumber. Now is the time to ride the wave.

Cuba is a Big Time Beaches 

The vast majority of Cuba’s tourists are drawn to the beautiful white-sand beaches that dot the country’s northern coastline and offshore islands. Beyond the beaches, however, is a land of fecund forests and crocodile-infested swamps, abandoned coffee plantations, and rugged mountains with revolutionary folklore and endemic species. Cuba, as noted by the German scientist Alexander von Humboldt, is a sort of Galápagos of the Caribbean where contradictory curiosities coexist. Get off the beaten path and go in search of them.

Facts about Cuba we bet you didn’t know before

  • Size and population: 11.2 million people living on a land area of 110,861 square kilometers. Both in terms of land mass and human population, Cuba is the largest island in the Caribbean.
    The literacy rate is extremely high and ranks among the highest in the world.
  • The Cuban peso (CUP) and the Cuban convertible peso (CUC) are the two forms of currency in Cuba (CUC).
  • The revolution took place between July 26, 1953, and January 1, 1959. The overthrow of the government that was led by Fulgencio Batista and the establishment of a revolutionary government that was led by Fidel Castro. Granma is the name of both a province in the eastern part of Cuba as well as one of Cuba’s national newspapers. Granma was the name of the boat that transported Fidel Castro and 81 other rebels from Mexico to Cuba in 1956. The vessel’s namesake, the grandmother of the boat’s first owner, inspired the boat’s moniker.
  • Christmas was a national holiday in Cuba until it was removed from the list of officially recognized holidays in 1969 and not reinstated until 1998.
  • Cuba is home to the bee hummingbird, which holds the record for being the smallest bird in the world.

Wondering when to book a flight to Cuba?

October through April is the optimal time to visit Cuba. This island has a wonderful Caribbean climate and a long season of beauty, with warm, sunny days and very little precipitation, especially in Havana and along the coast. The south coast beaches of Cuba enjoy the best weather on the island.

March and April are possibly the best months to visit Cuba, as the days are longer and sunnier (an average of seven hours of sunshine per day), the temperature and humidity are moderate, and there is little precipitation. The average daytime temperature in March and April is 27-29°C, while the average nighttime temperature is 19-21°C. Even during Cuba’s wettest months (May to September), the heat and humidity are rarely unbearable.

Airlines that fly to Cuba

You can get affordable airline tickets on Airline Reservations by searching for the airlines that offer the lowest fares to Cuba. We have direct connections with hundreds of full-service and low-cost carriers, giving you access to the widest range of affordable flight options and enabling you to easily compare booking prices across the board for all airlines that fly to Cuba.

How to Get Around in Cuba

Buses are the most common mode of transportation in Cuba, as few Cubans own cars. Two national bus networks exist. Vazul operates for foreign passport holders and Cubans paying in CUC, while the Empresa Omnibus Nacionales network operates for Cubans paying in national pesos.

Cuban taxis especially shared taxis, are an easy and relatively inexpensive mode of transportation. Car rental is another practical option. Train travel is slow but a great way to see the country, while cycling tours are becoming increasingly popular. For long distances, it may be advantageous to fly between destinations. Learn more about the pitfalls of the car rental and driving, getting around on buses, taxi options (Communal taxis, or taxis colectivos, long-distance taxis, tourist taxis, private taxis, bicitaxis, and moto-taxis), cycling, and train travel.

Places to Visit in Cuba

  • MARIA LA GORDA 

Maria La Gorda is a small town in the western region of Cuba. Maria La Gorda is one of the most popular tourist destinations in Cuba despite the fact that it lacks the colonial architecture and lively atmosphere for which Cuba is best known. Every year, adventure seekers flock to this location due to its thriving marine life. However, its Cuban charm and spectacular beaches make up for its lack of architecture. 

  • CAYO LARGO DEL SUR 

It is a small resort island separated from the Cuban mainland. This region is commonly known as Cayo Largo, which in the local language means “Long Cay.” It remains one of the best places to visit in Cuba to escape the crowds and enjoy some much-needed solitude along with the beautiful beaches. Playa Sirena, a popular beach on this island, attracts hundreds of thousands of visitors every day of the year. Another popular tourist destination in Cuba is the Marina, which is home to fascinating sea turtles and where tourists frequently witness seasonal hatchings.

  • SANTIAGO DE CUBA

Located in eastern Cuba, the popular Santiago de Cuba coastal city tour will make you feel as if you have stepped back in time. The region is still heavily influenced by its colonial past, as evidenced by the magnificent architecture of that time period. The most popular location in this area is Parque Cespedes. It is a plaza that contains and is surrounded by numerous colonial structures. Another popular attraction is the Castillo de San Pedro de la Roca, a magnificent 17th-century fortress with a breathtaking ocean view. 

  • VINALES 

Cuba has numerous national parks, each one more beautiful than the last. The best one, however, is located in the Vinales Valley. The valley is surrounded by mountains and contains abundant vegetation and tobacco plantations. There are also a number of caves, such as the Cuevas del Indio or Indian Caves, which are the most popular caves in this area. They are also the most desired destinations for adventure junkies. 

  • HAVANA

Havana is the capital city of Cuba, and exploring this vibrant city is a worthwhile experience. It has colonial mid-century architecture and is one of the most modern and cosmopolitan cities in the region. It has a vibrant nightlife culture and a coastline with spectacular views of the surrounding landscape and the ocean. Therefore, it remains a prime tourist destination and one of the most entertaining places to visit in Cuba.

Things to do in Cuba

  •  Playa Las Tumbas

What it is: a secluded beach on the westernmost point of the island, where palm trees, pure white sand, and crystal clear water predominate. It is four to five hours from Havana and is located at the tip of the Peninsula de Guanahacabibes National Park. No one ever said that having your own beach would be simple. Granted, there are more accessible and well-equipped beaches in Cuba. And many are attractive. But Las Tumbas gives you the feeling of having a private slice of paradise. The drive may be lengthy, but it is a great way to see parts of the island that few people see. Therefore, spending the night here is as much about the journey as it is about the destination.

  • Valle de Vinales

The Valle de Vinales tobacco plantation is a working plantation where tobacco and coffee, Cuba’s two most renowned agricultural exports, are grown. It is located in the Vinales Valley, a UNESCO World Heritage Site where you can stroll the fields while smoking a freshly-rolled cigar and sipping Cuban coffee. It’s the freshest cigar you’ll ever smoke, and although it’s not a household name like Paratagas or Romeo y Julieta, the experience here is far superior to that of a cigar factory for the casual Cuban traveler. It’s a popular tour stop, but despite the crowds, it’s still a great place for photos and an afternoon pick-me-up.

  •  The Ernest Hemingway Museum

Finca la Vigia is the former home of Ernest Hemingway, located about 10 miles outside of Havana. It is a sprawling hilltop estate with a swimming pool, Hemingway artifacts, and the author’s famous boat, the Pilar. In addition to writing The Old Man and the Sea and For Whom the Bell Tolls, he also penned these words in his imposing residence. Is it a tourist destination? Certainly, but it’s also one of the best-preserved mansions in the country, and there’s usually a Cuban band playing near the entrance, along with a full rum bar. You will also hear humorous anecdotes about Hemingway’s time here, such as how he used to spy on Ava Gardner while she was skinny dipping in the pool. 

  • National park Topes de Collantes 

What it is: a mountainous national park approximately 25 minutes south of Trinidad on the island’s southern coast. The park is located in the Sierra Escambray Mountains and features short trails that lead to underground caves, waterfalls, and concealed swimming holes. Most American tourists do not venture this far into natural Cuba, and the tropical mountain scenery is quintessentially Caribbean. It is the ideal escape from the towns and cities, as you can hike a few miles and swim in a pristine pool beneath a waterfall.

  • Mojitos are served somewhere in Havana

A Cuban drink that has become ubiquitous in American bars, made with rum, mint, sugar, and club soda. Hemingway made the margaritas at La Bodeguita del Medio famous, but sipping one at the Hotel Nacional is the epitome of celebrity in the 1950s. Or, visit La Chanchullero, which is considered by many to be the best in the city. It’s one of those eating/drinking experiences on everyone’s bucket list, like getting a cheesesteak in Philadelphia or wings in Buffalo. And nearly every bar in Havana will make a better mojito than any American bar because they use real sugar instead of syrup

Scroll to Top

Call us now!

For Cheap Airline Reservations

Get up to 30% on call